Thursday, May 24, 2012

Good-bye, Dear Maple; National Photo Month, Day 24


This isn't a very good photo of the enormous maple tree that has stood between our house and our neighbors' for far more years than either family has lived here. It's not a good tree photo because this is a cropped version of one of my garden spots. I didn't expect to need a photo of this big, old beauty today.

But, when I returned home from work today, here's what was left of the maple, which, admittedly, had become an accident waiting to happen. The neighbors finally gave in to reason and reluctantly had the tree removed.




Age had taken its toll on the grand specimen. Parts of it had become hollow. It would have only been a matter of time before a large portion of it came down on the neighbors' car or house. In 1997, we had a heavy October snow--before the leaves had turned and fallen. Following the storm, the city looked like a tornado had roared through, with trees downed and limbs twisted and mangled and piled as high as rooftops. We were without electricity for nine days and our acre took a couple of weeks to clear.

The big maple lost some large and significant limbs then. Subsequent storms continued to strip away parts of its frame.




Losing a tree that has been a part of our scenery for the 23 years we've lived here is tough. This evening we stood with our neighbor and reflected on the life and demise of a significant part of our landscape.

As the neighbor girls played in the sawdust, I was reminded that when our children were little we had a professional photo taken of the three of them in front of that then-sturdy maple. It had not yet lost one of its major trunks in that '97 storm.

It provided dense shade on the east side of our property. But, as the sun rose behind it every morning, the rays streamed through it, creating an ethereal setting.

Everything in nature evolves. Without the maple, that side of our yard and garden will get significantly more morning sun. As I look ahead, I envision, in that part of the yard, more color in what has always been a shade garden. We'll miss you, dear maple, but the future looks bright (and more colorful).

Make it a great day!

15 comments:

  1. Wow, this will be a change. It was a big, beautiful big tree. Enjoy planning your new garden.

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  2. That certainly was a large tree. After having the same view of the tree for twenty three years I can understand that you will miss everything about that beautiful tree.

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  3. It's always sad to lose an old friend. It will take some time to adjust to your new surroundings.

    I have been enjoying your month of photos. Hope you continue after the month ends.

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    1. Glad you're enjoying the photos. I would like to continue with at least one a day, if possible. It's fun, but can be demanding when my schedule gets hectic. I appreciate your kind comment. Thanks.

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  4. Sweet passage, dear, grand, elegant, sheltering tree.

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  5. I hate to see big beautiful trees taken down, but I know it needs to be done sometimes. You will miss that big tree but you can look forward to a colorful garden there.

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  6. Wow, that was one large maple. It's sad when such mature specimens are taken down but this one clearly needed to go before it caused damage.

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  7. Great shots of a wonderful tree.

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  8. Losing a tree is always sad to me. I was sorry to see it down. Thank you for visiting and commenting on my Memorial Day/Military Funeral post. ~Zuni

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  9. It's like losing a good friend...

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  10. What a touching post. Something that has been around for so long will surely be missed. I like your attitude for a more colorful and bright future. Can't wait to see what new garden plants find a home there. Thanks for sharing with Share Your Cup. I am now following you.
    Hugs,
    Jann

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  11. What a beautiful old tree. We have a maple in our front yard--one of the few in the neighborhood. It is still going strong. . . for now.

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  12. It's sad when stately old trees have to come down. I'm not a tree-hugger, but I sure appreciate their beauty. I guess on the bright side... lots of good fire wood!

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  13. We took down a couple of old elms two years ago and it has allowed the spruce trees to get more sun and double in size since then.


    Thank you for sharing at Your Sunday Best this week. xoxo

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  14. I am sure it was a spectacular specimen! It is sad to lose such a lovely tree - I am always fond of seeing large old trees - but you're right -the future is bright for that corner of the garden - let your imagination fly! I appreciate you sharing with Home and Garden Thursday,
    Kathy

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